Robert Frost 84, poet. A late riser (9 to 10), he is active outdoors (gardening, walking), works late every night.
Robert Frost 84, poet. A late riser (9 to 10), he is active outdoors (gardening, walking), works late every night.Alfred Eisenstaedt—The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images
Robert Frost 84, poet. A late riser (9 to 10), he is active outdoors (gardening, walking), works late every night.
Frank Lloyd Wright 89, works 12-hour day running fellowship for aspiring architects, dances and swims, says: "The more I abused my physical resources, the more I had."
Arthur Vining Davis 91, Alcoa's board chairman until last year, is using $400 million fortune to make more—in Florida realty.
Bernard M. Baruch 88, financier, onetime amateur boxer, says: "I live the same life as always—the only difference is that I go fewer and shorter rounds."
Bruno Walter 82, conductor, slowed by a heart attack, will give only one concert this season but will make a dozen recordings.
John Nance Garner 89, Vice President (1933-41), feeds his fowl, smokes Mexican cigars, devours the Congressional Record.
Roscoe Pound 87, lawyer and educator, an early (6:30) riser, puts in a 5 1/2-day week writing and counseling Harvard students, says: "What counts is a steady schedule—get to work and quit at regular times."
Roger Babson 83, statistician. After TB in his 60's, he had an appendectomy at 70, recommends: "Eat fresh air and store up sleep."
William Ernest Hocking 85, philosopher, works hard despite 1957 heart attack, may split fewer metaphysical and theological hairs but defies his doctors and splits wood for exercise.
Robert Frost 84, poet. A late riser (9 to 10), he is active outdoors (gardening, walking), works late every night.
Alfred Eisenstaedt—The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images
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What Longevity Looked Like in the 1950s

Feb 12, 2015

The question of how to live a long life is not a new one — and, as TIME explores in the new issue, the answer is constantly evolving.

When the magazine took a look at longevity in 1958, the story (featuring coverboy Amos Alonzo Stagg, a 96-year-old football coach) investigated the latest medical news of the decade, the changing demographics of the nation and the wisdom those extraordinary people had to offer the rest of us young'uns. While the science wasn't as clear as it is today, there was no shortage of role models. A four-page photo essay shot by Alfred Eisenstaedt featured some of the nation's most notable elderly men; nine of them are featured here, with the original captions, including their ages at the time.

Read the full 1958 longevity issue here, in the TIME Vault: Growing Old Usefully

Read the new longevity issue here, on Time.com: The New Age of Much Older Age

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