Dwindling Newspaper Sales Echo Through Economy
SAN FRANCISCO - SEPTEMBER 20: Freshly printed copies of the San Francisco Chronicle roll off the printing press at one of the Chronicle's printing facilities September 20, 2007 in San Francisco, California. Newspaper sales in the U.S. continue to slide as people turn to the internet and television for their news. The Chronicle saw its circulation plunge more than 15 percent in 2006 to 398,000 during the week which has hurt newspaper vendor Rick Gaub's business. Unable to sell as many papers as he used to, Gaub is looking for a new way to earn money after selling papers for 42 years. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

Today’s Journalism Still Inspires Future Generations

Ideas
The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Can today’s journalism still inspire future generations?

By Margaret Sullivan in the Columbia Journalism Review

2. Programs taking aim at the multigenerational cycle of poverty are working.

By Dwyer Gunn in Pacific Standard

3. How an assembly-line approach could end preventable blindness in one Indian state.

By Maria Thomas in Quartz

4. In the future, our clothes could be made from methane and clean the air.

By Adele Peters in Fast Company

5. The shorter your sleep, the shorter your life.

By Rachel Cooke in the Guardian

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.


Ideas
TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary on events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of TIME editors.
TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice.